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    Trees in the one-hectare second growth SI/MAB plot were recensused in 2001. Data were also collected for shrubs and small trees, coarse woody debris (CWD), and small mammals, and are presented here. For results on canopy cover, dwarf mistletoe, and slugs, see the 2001 student report. The SI/MAB plot was established in 1997 following the Smithsonian Institution / Man and Biosphere Program (now Monitoring and Assessment of Biodiversity) or SI/MAB protocol. It is located on the north side of Grappler Inlet near Bamfield, British Columbia on property owned and administered by the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre. The centre of the plot has GPS coordinates 48°50’19.00”N, 125°08’02.00”W (48.83861111, -125.13388889). The SI/MAB plot is divided into 25 quadrats (20m x 20m). In 2001 quadrats were renumbered for north/south discrepancies. Trees with a DBH (diameter at breast height) ≥ 4 cm were recensused for species, DBH and status (physical condition). For the 2001 census, dead fallen trees were counted as coarse woody debris instead of trees. Shrubs and small trees (maximum DBH of 4cm) were identified and tagged following the Ecological Monitoring and Assessment Network (EMAN) protocol for Shrub and Small Tree Sampling. In 1999, 11 5x5m quadrats were randomly chosen in corners of randomly chosen 20mx20m quadrats in the SI/MAB plot. In 2001, the 11 quadrats were resampled, and 4 more quadrats were sampled. A species list of shrubs and small trees is presented here. Coarse woody debris was counted along three transects within the SI/MAB plot (site A = wet; site B = steep slope; site C = flat, stem exclusion). Each 90m transect consisted of an equilateral triangle with sides of 30m each. Triangles were used to ensure that any orientation biases were accounted for as pieces may have a dominant direction of fall. Data for coarse woody debris and volume calculations are presented here. Three days of live trapping of small mammals (i.e. deer mice) was done using two edge transects parallel but 3m from south and east edges of plot to minimize disturbance. Data is presented here. The majority of data was collected by students in the Coastal Biodiversity and Conservation course taught by Dr. Tom Berman July 23-Aug 31, 2001 with Teaching Assistant Dana Haggarty. Shrub and small tree data from 1999 was collected by students in the Coastal Biodiversity and Conservation course taught by Dr. Tom Berman and Dr. Andre Martel June 7-July 16, 1999.

    Published on: 10 November 2018

    Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11272/10651

    The Postal Code Conversion File (PCCF) is a digital file which provides a correspondence between the Canada Post Corporation (CPC) six-character postal code and Statistics Canada’s standard geographic areas for which census data and other statistics are produced. Through the link between postal codes and standard geographic areas, the PCCF permits the integration of data from various sources. The geographic coordinates, which represent the standard geostatistical areas linked to each postal code on the PCCF, are commonly used to map the distribution of data for spatial analysis (e.g., clients, activities). The location information is a powerful tool for marketing, planning, or research purposes. In April 1983, the Statistical Registers and Geography Division released the first version of the PCCF, which linked postal codes to 1981 Census geographic areas and included geographic coordinates. Since then, the file has been updated on a regular basis to reflect changes. For this release of the PCCF, the vast majority of the postal codes are directly geocoded to 2016 Census geography while others are linked via various conversion processes. A quality indicator for the confidence of this linkage is available in the PCCF.

    Published on: 09 November 2018

    Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11272/10659

    The study contains data on: i) CO2, CH4 and N2O concentrations and fluxes, and the parameters that were used for computation of GHG fluxes, and ii) DOC and NO3 concentrations from a stormwater detained in a constructed wetland. These data were collected in order to evaluate the spatial and temporal dynamics of GHG fluxes and water quality from stormwater runoff.

    Published on: 09 November 2018

    Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11272/10676

    Introduction IARPA Babel Kazakh Language Pack IARPA-babel302b-v1.0a was developed by Appen for the IARPA (Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity) Babel program. It contains approximately 203 hours of Kazakh conversational and scripted telephone speech collected in 2013 and 2014 along with corresponding transcripts. The Babel program focuses on underserved languages and seeks to develop speech recognition technology that can be rapidly applied to any human language to support keyword search performance over large amounts of recorded speech. Data The Kazakh speech in this release represents that spoken in the Northeastern and Southern dialect regions of Kazakhstan. The gender distribution among speakers is approximately equal; speakers’ ages range from 16 years to 64 years. Calls were made using different telephones (e.g., mobile, landline) from a variety of environments including the street, a home or office, a public place, and inside a vehicle. Audio data is presented as 8kHz 8-bit a-law encoded audio in sphere format and 48kHz 24-bit PCM encoded audio in wav format. Transcripts are encoded in UTF-8. Further information about transcription methodology is contained in the documentation accompanying this release. Evaluation data is available from NIST in support of OpenKWS.

    Published on: 07 November 2018

    Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11272/DWKVZ

    Systematic evaluation of splice isoform function to determine genes with functionally distinct splice isoforms based on experimental evidence. Framework and analysis of curation provided in the above preprint. The data are provided in two parts. First part is the PubMed IDs of all curated studies and their annotations based on our curation framework. Second, are the genes with literature evidence of functionally distinct splice isoforms, and further notes about functional distinctness.

    Published on: 05 November 2018

    Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11272/10628

    CanMap Content Suite contains over 100 unique and rich content layers. Each layer has a unique file and layer name with associated definitions, descriptions, attribution and metadata. All layers, with a few exceptions, are vector data consisting of polygon, polyline, or point geometry representation.

    Published on: 05 November 2018

    Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11272/LYHCR

    CanMap Content Suite contains over 100 unique and rich content layers. Each layer has a unique file and layer name with associated definitions, descriptions, attribution and metadata. All layers, with a few exceptions, are vector data consisting of polygon, polyline, or point geometry representation.

    Published on: 05 November 2018

    Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11272/MJRF2

    CanMap Content Suite contains over 100 unique and rich content layers. Each layer has a unique file and layer name with associated definitions, descriptions, attribution and metadata. All layers, with a few exceptions, are vector data consisting of polygon, polyline, or point geometry representation.

    Published on: 05 November 2018

    Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11272/F3TSZ

    LFS data are used to produce the well-known unemployment rate as well as other standard labour market indicators such as the employment rate and the participation rate. The LFS also provides employment estimates by industry, occupation, public and private sector, hours worked and much more, all cross-classifiable by a variety of demographic characteristics. Estimates are produced for Canada, the provinces, the territories and a large number of sub-provincial regions. For employees, data on wage rates, union status, job permanency and establishment size are also produced. These data are used by different levels of government for evaluation and planning of employment programs in Canada. Regional unemployment rates are used by Employment and Social Development Canada to determine eligibility, level and duration of insurance benefits for persons living within a particular employment insurance region. The data are also used by labour market analysts, economists, consultants, planners, forecasters and academics in both the private and public sector.

    Published on: 02 November 2018

    Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11272/10575

    Canadian business counts—previously called Canadian business patterns—provide counts of active businesses by industry classification and employment-size categories for Canada and the provinces and territories. Canadian business counts are based on the same criteria that were used to calculate Canadian business patterns. The counts are compiled from the Business Register, Statistics Canada’s central listing of Canadian businesses. They are based on the statistical concept of “location”—that is, each operating location is separately counted, including cases where one business comprises multiple locations. For example, a retail business with 10 stores represents 10 businesses in the Canadian business counts. Generally, among all Canadian businesses, 95% are single-location enterprises. Changes to the Business Register’s methodology or business industrial classification strategies can bring about increases or decreases in the number of active businesses reported in the Canadian business counts. As a result, the data do not represent changes in the business population over time. Statistics Canada recommends that users not use the data as a time series.

    Published on: 02 November 2018

    Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11272/10655